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« In arms supply, second place is way back there | Main | How about we work the actionable problems? »
4:32AM

For a New Economic Era, We Need New Allies

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President Barack Obama's performance at the United Nations last week was widely hailed -- and condemned -- as a clear departure from that of his predecessor, George W. Bush. His most telling statement spoke volumes about the limits of U.S. power in an interdependent world: "Those who used to chastise America for acting alone in the world cannot now stand by and wait for America to solve the world's problems alone." Subtext? Atlas has put down the heavy globe and has neither the intention nor the wherewithal to pick it up again.

Continue reading this week's New Rules column at WPR.

Reader Comments (4)

To me, one of the biggest questions we face (and I'm using 'we' in many senses, including the current administration, the US as a whole, NATO, the world, the UN, etc, etc) is whether the European Community, either as an institution in its own right or through its member states, will fully engage in Afghanistan and related potentially kinetic operations.

When everyone was screaming about Dafur, my reaction was "Go ask the French, we're kinda busy right now." Spain pulled out after a terrorist attack and a change in government (we can argue about causality there...), Italy's reviewing its commitments after the loss of 5 soldiers, this was a topic in the German elections, and today on NPR I heard a piece that asked "Is Britain about to lose its 4th Afghan war?"
September 28, 2009 | Unregistered CommenterDavid Emery
I agree with TPMB that Zakaria's otherwise excellent book should have been titled "The Post-Caucasian World" rather than "The Post-American World". The EU doesn't get that. I'm not sure yet whether the US does. The EU mindset is still very much trapped in the colonialist frame - if we can't own the world, we're going to take our marbles and go home. They won't realize that is not a viable worldview until they start noticing the shortage of marbles.
September 28, 2009 | Unregistered Commenterstuart abrams
Why can't we just say it like it is.

1) The Taliban provided a safe haven for al Qaeda to plan and project power in foreign countries, e.g. 9/11, London, Spain, etc. In this they are accessories both before and after the fact.

2) Their main adversary is not the West, but educated Muslim women.

3) Pakistan is at risk to the festering sore that is the Taliban and al Qaeda.

4) Pakistan has nukes and it is not clear they fully understand their responsibilities in these matters. The safety and security of these devices and the technology is a terrible responsibility. [ I don't think Iran gets this either.]

5) We can be helpful with 1), 2), and 3).

6) Major reductions in our effort or understanding will not be helpful.
September 28, 2009 | Unregistered CommenterGerry
A very timely article. With the recent attempt to find more positive world solutions through the G20 instead of the UN & recent Gap antics with Chavez & Qaddafhi this is great perspective for hope.
September 28, 2009 | Unregistered CommenterElmer Humes

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